August 20, 2014 / 8:05PM 8,222 notes

This makes me SOOOO happy. #BlackGirlsRock

siphotos:

Thirteen-year-old sensation Mo’ne Davis, who plays for Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, has become the first Little Leaguer to grace the national cover of Sports Illustrated. The 5-foot-4 inch, 111-pound eighth grader is not only taking the Little League World Series by storm, but also she has captured the nation’s attention. 
SI STAFF: More information on Mo’ne Davis cover GALLERY: View all of SI’s 2014 Covers
 

This makes me SOOOO happy. #BlackGirlsRock

siphotos:

Thirteen-year-old sensation Mo’ne Davis, who plays for Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, has become the first Little Leaguer to grace the national cover of Sports Illustrated. The 5-foot-4 inch, 111-pound eighth grader is not only taking the Little League World Series by storm, but also she has captured the nation’s attention. 

SI STAFF: More information on Mo’ne Davis cover 
GALLERY: View all of SI’s 2014 Covers

 

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August 14, 2014 / 4:52PM 108,048 notes

tee-ambition:

blvckshogun:

theairtonight:

venus-meanest:

pas-une-ange:

relevant

People love to forget Michael Jackson’s blackness

people love to think that Michael Jackson forgot his blackness

^

Because of how relevant this is, I will forever repost.

(Source: -intheround, via naturallychic)

ferguson

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August 14, 2014 / 4:52PM 1,520 notes

My almost birthday twin.

(Source: nearlyvintage, via abstrackafricana)

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August 14, 2014 / 4:51PM 1,997 notes

gradientlair:

Jesse Williams LET THEM KNOW! He has always kept it 100 and speaks in defense of Black life, celebrity career to “protect” or not. And I’m not saying that there is not a price for speaking out (as some Black celebs over time and definitely non-famous Black people are punished and abused for speaking out) or that the racism itself that a Black celeb has to speak against/not speak against is their fault. It is not.
But even so, taking the politics of respectability route or conflating intraracial violence with State violence/systemic abuse/Constitutional violations route, thereby denying the reality of extrajudicial execution and State violence on Black life is the route he did NOT take.
Thank you, sir. ❤ 

gradientlair:

Jesse Williams LET THEM KNOW! He has always kept it 100 and speaks in defense of Black life, celebrity career to “protect” or not. And I’m not saying that there is not a price for speaking out (as some Black celebs over time and definitely non-famous Black people are punished and abused for speaking out) or that the racism itself that a Black celeb has to speak against/not speak against is their fault. It is not.

But even so, taking the politics of respectability route or conflating intraracial violence with State violence/systemic abuse/Constitutional violations route, thereby denying the reality of extrajudicial execution and State violence on Black life is the route he did NOT take.

Thank you, sir.  

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August 14, 2014 / 4:50PM 4,640 notes

fotojournalismus:

Ferguson, Mo. | August 13, 2014

1. A protester throws back a smoke bomb while clashing with police. (Mario Anzuoni/Reuters)

2. Riot police clear a street with smoke bombs. (Mario Anzuoni/Reuters)

3. Police surround and detain two people in a car. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

4. Police officers work their way north on West Florissant Avenue, clearing the road with the use of tear gas and smoke bombs. (Robert Cohen/AP)

5. A police officer patrols a business district. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

6. A demonstrator, protesting the shooting death of teenager Michael Brown, stands his ground as police fire tear gas. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

7. An explosive device deployed by police flies in the air. (Jeff Roberson/AP)

8. A demonstrator holds up a Pan-African flag to protest the killing of Michael Brown. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

9. A device fired by police goes off in the street. (Jeff Roberson/AP)

10. A demonstrator throws back a tear gas container after tactical officers worked to break up a group of bystanders on Chambers Road and West Florissant in St. Louis. (Robert Cohen/AP)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)

(via naturallychic)

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August 14, 2014 / 4:49PM 124,750 notes

grilledsneakers:

This is what the people of Ferguson are up against and if you still don’t think that this is a big deal then you need to wake the fuck up

(via naturallychic)

ferguson

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August 14, 2014 / 4:48PM 152,228 notes

Go in and let have, John Legend.

marfmellow:

politicalsexkitten:

John Legend doesn’t take shit.

JOHN!!!

(via naturallychic)

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August 12, 2014 / 1:40AM 868 notes

pbsamericanmasters:

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 11, 1973: The Birth of Hip-Hop
On this day in 1973, DJ Kool Herc dropped a new sound that changed history. While DJ’ing at his sister’s back-to-school party, Herc tried something new on the turntable: he extended an instrumental beat (scratching the track) to let people dance longer (break dancing) and began MC’ing (rapping) during the extended breakdancing. And so DJ Kool Herc set hip-hop on its dynamic evolution towards the expressive art form it is today.
Take an intimate look at the innovation, excitement and collective spirit that characterizes the early beginnings of hip-hop and its influence today.
Photo: Bigtimepeace: DJ Kool Herc spins records in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx at an event addressing “The West Indian Roots of Hip-Hop,” February 28, 2009. (Wikimedia Commons)

A great day for music! 

pbsamericanmasters:

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 11, 1973: The Birth of Hip-Hop

On this day in 1973, DJ Kool Herc dropped a new sound that changed history. While DJ’ing at his sister’s back-to-school party, Herc tried something new on the turntable: he extended an instrumental beat (scratching the track) to let people dance longer (break dancing) and began MC’ing (rapping) during the extended breakdancing. And so DJ Kool Herc set hip-hop on its dynamic evolution towards the expressive art form it is today.

Take an intimate look at the innovation, excitement and collective spirit that characterizes the early beginnings of hip-hop and its influence today.

Photo: Bigtimepeace: DJ Kool Herc spins records in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx at an event addressing “The West Indian Roots of Hip-Hop,” February 28, 2009. (Wikimedia Commons)

A great day for music! 

(via heytoyourmamanem)

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I don’t care if Mike Brown was going to college soon. This should not matter. We should not have to prove Mike Brown was worthy of living. We should not have to account for the ways in which he is suitably respectable. We should not have to prove that his body did not deserve to be riddled with bullets. His community should not have to silence their anger so they won’t be accused of rioting, so they won’t become targets too.

"silence is not an option," roxane gay (via brookehatfield)

(via blackfashion)

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August 9, 2014 / 11:21PM 2 notes

maya rudolph

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